Aeration and dissolution behavior of oxygen nanobubbles in water

Shan Xue, Yihan Zhang, Taha Marhaba, Wen Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Hypothesis: Nanobubbles (NBs) in water elicit unique physicochemical and colloidal properties (e.g., high stability and longevity). Aeration kinetics and dissolution behavior of oxygen (O2) NBs are assumed to be bubble size dependent. Experiments: As an indicator for aeration efficiency, volumetric mass transfer coefficient (KL·a) was assessed by measuring the dissolved oxygen (DO) levels during aeration using O2 NBs with different sizes. Mass transfer coefficient (KL) was estimated by correlation analysis. Moreover, a modified Epstein-Plesset (EP) model was developed to predict the dissolution behavior by monitoring the DO and size changes during the dissolution of O2 NBs in water. Findings: A higher rate of DO increase and a higher equilibrium DO level were both observed after aeration with NBs that present higher surface areas for the mass transfer of O2 and a higher vapor pressure of O2 to drive the partitioning equilibrium. Dissolution kinetics of O2 NBs were highly dependent on the initial bubble size as indicated by the changes of bubble size and DO. Smaller NBs raised up DO faster, whereas larger NBs could lead to higher equilibrium DO levels. Moreover, the rate of DO decline and the quasi-steady DO levels both decreased when the dilution ratio increased, confirming that O2 NBs dictates the DO level in water. Finally, the dissolving NBs may either swell or shrink according to the model prediction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Colloid And Interface Science
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Keywords

  • Aeration
  • Bubble size
  • Dissolution
  • Epstein-Plesset theory
  • Mass transfer
  • Nanobubbles

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