All the news that you don't like: Cross-cutting exposure and political participation in the age of social media

Seong Jae Min, Donghee Yvette Wohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the factors that affect the relationship between cross-cutting exposure and political participation. It was found that cross-cutting exposure to politically disagreeable news on Facebook, overall, was associated with increased political participation both online and offline. The association was stronger when the cross-cutting exposure came from weak ties, or acquaintances and strangers, and when the individuals were highly engaged with the cross-cutting news. Cross-cutting exposure from strong ties showed no significant relationship with political participation. It is suggested that cross-cutting exposure and political participation in the age of social media are different from those of the offline world, because they are supported by the norm of individual self-expression and take place in more anonymous and comfortable settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-31
Number of pages8
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume83
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)

Keywords

  • Cross-cutting exposure
  • Disagreement
  • Facebook
  • Political conversation
  • Political participation
  • Social media

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