An application of a theorem of Johnstone and Forrester to testing for familial aggregation

Yixin Fang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In family studies, genetic epidemiologists are interested in choosing traits, or combinations of traits, of high degree of familial aggregation to use in the linkage analysis. Principal components analysis of heritability, similar to canonical correlation analysis, estimates the linear combination with the largest heritability. However, the first and foremost task is to test if there is any trait, or combination of traits, of familial aggregation. To this aim, a type of permutation test is proposed. Since the permutation test is time-consuming, a theorem of Johnstone and Forrester (2004) can be used to obtain the approximate p-value.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBioMedical Engineering and Informatics
Subtitle of host publicationNew Development and the Future - Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on BioMedical Engineering and Informatics, BMEI 2008
Pages773-777
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 18 2008
EventBioMedical Engineering and Informatics: New Development and the Future - 1st International Conference on BioMedical Engineering and Informatics, BMEI 2008 - Sanya, Hainan, China
Duration: May 27 2008May 30 2008

Publication series

NameBioMedical Engineering and Informatics: New Development and the Future - Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on BioMedical Engineering and Informatics, BMEI 2008
Volume2

Other

OtherBioMedical Engineering and Informatics: New Development and the Future - 1st International Conference on BioMedical Engineering and Informatics, BMEI 2008
CountryChina
CitySanya, Hainan
Period5/27/085/30/08

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Information Systems
  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering

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