Assessing computational thinking in students' game designs

Amy Hoover, Gillian Puttick, Jackie Barnes, Eli Tucker-Raymond, Borna Fatehi, Casper Harteveld, Jesús Moreno-León

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Designing games requires a complex sequence of planning and executing actions. This paper suggests that game design requires computational thinking, and discusses two methods for analyzing computational thinking in games designed by students in the visual programming language Scratch. We present how these two analyses produce different narratives of computational thinking for our case studies, and reflect on how we plan to move forward with our larger analysis. Copyrights for third-party components of this work must be honored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCHI PLAY 2016 - Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play Companion
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages173-179
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9781450344586
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 16 2016
Externally publishedYes
Event3rd ACM SIGCHI Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, CHI PLAY 2016 - Austin, United States
Duration: Oct 16 2016Oct 19 2016

Other

Other3rd ACM SIGCHI Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, CHI PLAY 2016
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityAustin
Period10/16/1610/19/16

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human-Computer Interaction

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