Coating and granulation of fine particles using a standard fluidized bed

Jun Yang, Yuhua Chen, Rajesh Dave, Robert Pfeffer

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

Fluidized beds are widely used for particle coating and granulation in pharmaceutical and chemical industries due to its high heat and mass transfer efficiency, and ease of scale-up. However, the conventional fluidized bed cannot be used for handling fine particles (less than 40 microns) due to their poor fluidizability. In this paper, a proprietary technique, which involves the use of nanosized particles to create nano-scale roughness on the surface of particles (much less than 40 microns) to be fluidized, is developed for improving the fluidization behavior of cohesive powders. Utilizing this technique, experiments on coating and granulation of fine particles (15 micron cornstarch and 15 micron aluminum) are performed using a standard fluidized bed unit. The results indicate that the fine particles can be stably fluidized after they are pre-treated with nanosized particles. Subsequently, very uniformly coated particles can be obtained through this novel approach. By changing the operating conditions, the same process can be used for granulation of fine particles. The effect of changing the operating variables on the properties of the final product is also investigated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - 2006
Event2006 AIChE Spring National Meeting - 5th World Congress on Particle Technology - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Apr 23 2006Apr 27 2006

Other

Other2006 AIChE Spring National Meeting - 5th World Congress on Particle Technology
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period4/23/064/27/06

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Chemistry(all)

Keywords

  • Coating
  • Cohesion
  • Dry-particle coating
  • Fine particle
  • Fluidized bed
  • Granulation
  • Nano-scale roughness
  • Nanoparticles

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