Coexistence of two microbial populations competing for a renewable resource in a non-predator-prey system

Basil C. Baltzis, A. G. Fredrickson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

If two microbial populations compete for a single resource in a homogeneous environment with time invariant inputs they cannot coexist indefinitely if the resource competed for is not renewed by biological activity within the system. Mathematical studies have shown that in a predator-prey system, where the resource (prey) is self-renewing, the two competitors (predators) can coexist in a limit cycle. This suggests that if the resource competed for is renewed by biological activity within the system coexistence can occur in any microbial system provided that it exhibits the same features as, but without being, a predator-prey one. A food chain involving commensalism, competition and amensalism is presented here. Two subcases are considered. It is only when maintenance effects are taken into account that coexistence, in limit cycles, can occur for this system. Limit cycle solutions for the system are demonstrated with the help of computer simulations. Some necessary conditions for coexistence are presented, as are some speculations regarding the possible physical explanations of the results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-174
Number of pages20
JournalBulletin of Mathematical Biology
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1984
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Immunology
  • Mathematics(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Pharmacology
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics

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