Control processes in fast movements end before the peak velocity: evidence based on experimental analysis and modelling

Anatol G. Feldman, Serge V. Adamovich, Nancy St.-Onge, Mindy F. Levin

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

Both experimental effects of perturbations and computer simulation indicate that shifts in the equilibrium position underlying fast discrete movements of the elbow are completed before the peak velocity of movement and thus before the end of the phasic EMG activity. Our results imply that EMG patterns and the resulting kinematics are not preprogrammed but represent long-lasting dynamic responses of the system to this short-duration control pattern combined with the effects of load and peripheral feedback.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)394-395
Number of pages2
JournalAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume16
Issue numberpt 1
StatePublished - Dec 1 1994
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 16th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Part 1 (of 2) - Baltimore, MD, USA
Duration: Nov 3 1994Nov 6 1994

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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