Detecting double compression of audio signal

Rui Yang, Yun-Qing Shi, Jiwu Huang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

MP3 is the most popular audio format nowadays in our daily life, for example music downloaded from the Internet and file saved in the digital recorder are often in MP3 format. However, low bitrate MP3s are often transcoded to high bitrate since high bitrate ones are of high commercial value. Also audio recording in digital recorder can be doctored easily by pervasive audio editing software. This paper presents two methods for the detection of double MP3 compression. The methods are essential for finding out fake-quality MP3 and audio forensics. The proposed methods use support vector machine classifiers with feature vectors formed by the distributions of the first digits of the quantized MDCT (modified discrete cosine transform) coefficients. Extensive experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. To the best of our knowledge, this piece of work is the first one to detect double compression of audio signal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE-IS and T Electronic Imaging - Media Forensics and Security II
DOIs
StatePublished - May 10 2010
EventMedia Forensics and Security II - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 18 2010Jan 20 2010

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume7541
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Other

OtherMedia Forensics and Security II
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/18/101/20/10

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Keywords

  • Audio forensics
  • Double MP3 compression
  • First digit law
  • MDCT coefficients

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