Disruption of activity in the ventral premotor but not the anterior intraparietal area interferes with on-line correction to a haptic perturbation during grasping

Luis F. Schettino, Sergei V. Adamovich, Hamid Bagce, Mathew Yarossi, Eugene Tunik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Replanning ongoing movements following perturbations requires the accurate and immediate estimation of the motor response based on sensory input. Previous studies have used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in humans to demonstrate the participation of the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) and ventral premotor cortex (PMv) in visually mediated state estimation for grasping. Here, we test the role of parietofrontal circuits in processing the corrective responses to haptic perturbations of the finger during prehension. Subjects reached to grasp an object while having to compensate for a novel and unpredictable haptic perturbation of finger extension. TMS-based transient disruptions to the PMv and aIPS were delivered 0, 50, or 100 ms after the perturbation.TMSto the PMv delivered 50 ms after the perturbation (but not 0 or 100 ms, or in unperturbed trials) led to an overestimation of grasp aperture. No effects on grasp aperture were noted for the aIPS. Our results indicate that the PMv (but not aIPS) is involved in the deployment of the compensatory response in the presence of haptic perturbations during prehension. Our data also identify the time window of neural processing in the PMv when reprogramming occurs to be 50–100 ms following the perturbation onset.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2112-2117
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Keywords

  • Frontoparietal
  • Grasping
  • Haptic perturbation
  • On-line control
  • TMS
  • Updating

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