Dynamic interaction of oscillatory neurons coupled with reciprocally inhibitory synapses acts to stabilize the rhythm period

Akira Mamiya, Farzan Nadim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the rhythmically active pyloric circuit of the spiny lobster, the pyloric dilator (PD) neurons are members of the pacemaker group of neurons that make inhibitory synapses onto the follower lateral pyloric (LP) neuron. The LP neuron, in turn, makes a depressing inhibitory synapse to the PD neurons, providing the sole inhibitory feedback from the pyloric network to its pacemakers. This study investigates the dynamic interaction between the pyloric cycle period, the two types of neurons, and the feedback synapse in biologically realistic conditions. When the rhythm period was changed, the membrane potential waveform of the LP neuron was affected with a consistent pattern. These changes in the LP neuron waveform directly affected the dynamics of the LP to PD synapse and caused the postsynaptic potential (PSP) in the PD neurons to both peak earlier in phase and become larger in amplitude. Using an artificial synapse implemented in dynamic clamp, we show that when the LP to PD PSP occurred early in phase, it acted to speed up the pyloric rhythm, and larger PSPs also strengthened this trend. Together, these results indicate that interactions between these two types of neurons can dynamically change in response to increases in the rhythm period, and this dynamic change provides a negative feedback to the pacemaker group that could work to stabilize the rhythm period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5140-5150
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume24
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2 2004

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Keywords

  • Central pattern generator
  • Dynamic clamp
  • Motor system
  • Oscillator
  • Stomatogastric ganglion
  • Synaptic depression
  • Synaptic dynamics

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