Effects of chemical oxygen demand and chloramphenicol on attached microalgae growth: Physicochemical properties and microscopic mass transfer in biofilm

Peihua Li, Yanan Yang, Lin Lan Zhuang, Zhen Hu, Lijie Zhang, Shuhan Ge, Weiyi Qian, Wanqing Tian, Yinhu Wu, Hong Ying Hu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

During the wastewater treatment and resource recovery process by attached microalgae, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) can cause biotic contamination in algal culture systems, which can be mitigated by adding an appropriate dosage of antibiotics. The transport of COD and additive antibiotic (chloramphenicol, CAP) in algal biofilms and their influence on algal physiology were studied. The results showed that COD (60 mg/L) affected key metabolic pathways, such as photosystem II and oxidative phosphorylation, improved biofilm autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolic intensities, increased nutrient demand, and promoted biomass accumulation by 55.9 %, which was the most suitable COD concentration for attached microalgae. CAP (5–10 mg/L) effectively stimulated photosynthetic pigment accumulation and nutrient utilization in pelagic microalgal cells. In conclusion, controlling the COD concentration (approximately 60 mg/L) in the medium and adding the appropriate CAP concentration (5–10 mg/L) are conducive to improving attached microalgal biomass production and resource recovery potential from wastewater.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number130561
JournalBioresource Technology
Volume399
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2024

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Waste Management and Disposal

Keywords

  • Light transfer
  • Microalgal biofilm
  • Nutrient transport
  • Resource recovery
  • Wastewater treatment

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