Effects of water resources planning on land development projects

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

Land development regulations in the state of New Jersey have been utilized to control development since the mid-1970's. The demand for affordable housing in the state is reaching a critical period since the median price of a single-family dwelling in New Jersey currently exceeds $170,000. At the present time a land development project faces independent action from the local and county planning boards as well as a long list of individual permits required by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP). These permits amount to such items as stream encroachment, stormwater management, sanitary sewer extension permits, freshwater wetlands, and restrictions on the use of septic systems or the flow of sewage to existing treatment plants (micromanagement of a watershed). Since all the above items are treated as independent and theoretically unrelated review procedures, the time it takes for a developer to obtain the necessary approvals prior to construction has risen to an average of two to three year. At the present time, the NJDEP is moving towards a watershed-based permitting process that will examine the cumulative effects of all the previously cited permits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages193-196
Number of pages4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
EventProceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference on Integrated Water Resources Planning for the 21st Century - Cambridge, MA, USA
Duration: May 7 1995May 11 1995

Other

OtherProceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference on Integrated Water Resources Planning for the 21st Century
CityCambridge, MA, USA
Period5/7/955/11/95

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

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