Gender, ethnicity, and demographic factors influencing promotions to managers for auditors: An empirical analysis

Asokan Anandarajan, Iftekhar Hasan, Glen Moyes, Fred Wulsin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to examine factors associated with promotions to manager of certified public accountants in auditing with special emphasis on ethnicity and gender. A survey was sent to 2,427 Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) in Santa Clara County, California. We conducted a logistic regression using the survey responses and found that CPAs who were managers had more years of experience and exhibited greater job proficiency in terms of discovering material irregularities and financial statement fraud. They also tended to be predominantly male. Conversely, CPAs who have not succeeded to the position of audit manager tended to have lesser years of experience than those who had, and lower frequencies of detecting material irregularities. They also tended to be predominantly female. While gender appeared to be a significant variable that correlated negatively with promotions, there did not appear to be a significant negative correlation with ethnicity. While there appeared to be a weak association between ethnicity and managerial promotions, this association was not statistically significant. Other factors such as level of college education including holding Master's degrees and possession of additional accounting certifications did not appear to influence the likelihood of becoming an audit manager.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMirrors and Prisms Interrogating Accounting
PublisherJAI Press
Pages1-29
Number of pages29
ISBN (Print)076230958X, 9780762309580
StatePublished - 2002

Publication series

NameAdvances in Public Interest Accounting
Volume9
ISSN (Print)1041-7060

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Accounting
  • Sociology and Political Science

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Gender, ethnicity, and demographic factors influencing promotions to managers for auditors: An empirical analysis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this