GIS-based risk assessment of hail disasters affecting cotton and its spatiotemporal evolution in China

Lin Wang, Guofang Hu, Yaojie Yue, Xinyue Ye, Min Li, Jintao Zhao, Jinhong Wan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Understanding the spatiotemporal distribution pattern of hail disaster risk for cotton is crucial in mitigating hail disaster and promoting the sustainability of cotton farming. Based on such indexes as hail disaster frequency, spatiotemporal exposure, and vulnerability of cotton, we assess hail disaster risk for cotton, and analyze its spatiotemporal pattern and evolution in Mainland China from 1950 to 2009, supported by geographic information system (GIS). The following conclusions are drawn: (1) The proposed risk assessment method reveals the spatiotemporal difference of hail disaster risk for cotton at the county level. (2) Hail disaster risk for cotton is low in China, except for north of the North China Plain and the cotton-planting areas in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. From 1950 to 2009, hail disaster risk for cotton gradually increased. (3) The descending orders of hail disaster risk levels for cotton are bud stage, seedling stage, sowing and seeding stage, boll stage, and boll opening stage. The growth period with the highest risk varies across the cotton-planting areas. (4) The results of this paper are important for developing hail disaster prevention and reduction measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number218
JournalSustainability (Switzerland)
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 29 2016
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Keywords

  • Cotton
  • Dynamic variation
  • GIS
  • Growth periods
  • Hail disasters
  • Risk assessment
  • Spatial distribution

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