Identity inference as a privacy risk in computer-mediated communication

Sara Motahari, Sotirios Ziavras, Richard P. Schuler, Quentin Jones

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

New Web 2.0 applications, with their emphasis on collaboration and communication, hold the promise of major advances in social connectivity and coordination; however, they also increase the threats to user privacy. An important, yet under-researched privacy risk results from social inferences about user identity, location, and activities. In this paper, we frame the 'social inference problem'. We then present the results from a 292 subject experiment that highlights: 1) the prevalence of social inference risks; 2) people's difficulties in accurately predicting social inference risks; and 3) the relation between information entropy and social inference. We also show how to predict possible social inferences by modeling users' background knowledge and calculating information entropy and discuss how social inference support systems can be deployed that protect user privacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 42nd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Event42nd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS - Waikoloa, HI, United States
Duration: Jan 5 2009Jan 9 2009

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 42nd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS

Other

Other42nd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS
CountryUnited States
CityWaikoloa, HI
Period1/5/091/9/09

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Information Systems

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