Interfacing a haptic robotic system with complex virtual environments to treat impaired upper extremity motor function in children with cerebral palsy

Gerard G. Fluet, Qinyin Qiu, Donna Kelly, Heta D. Parikh, Diego Ramirez, Soha Saleh, Sergei V. Adamovich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the ability of the New Jersey Institute of Technology Robot Assisted Virtual Rehabilitation (NJIT-RAVR) system training to elicit changes in upper extremity (UE) function in children with hemiplegia secondary to cerebral palsy. Methods: Nine children (mean age 9 years, three males) participated in three pilots. Subjects trained 1 hour, 3 days a week for 3 weeks. Two groups performed this protocol as their only intervention. The third group also performed 56 hours of constraint-induced movement therapy. Results: All subjects participated in a short programme of nine, 60-minute training sessions without adverse effects. As a group, subjects demonstrated statistically significant improvements in Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function Test, a composite of three timed UE tasks and several measurements of reaching kinematics. Several subjects demonstrated clinically significant improvements in active shoulder abduction and flexion as well as forearm supination. Conclusion: Three small pilots of NJIT-RAVR training demonstrated measurable benefit with no complications, warranting further examination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-345
Number of pages11
JournalDevelopmental Neurorehabilitation
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Rehabilitation
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Keywords

  • Cerebral palsy
  • hemiplegia
  • rehabilitation
  • robotics
  • upper extremity
  • virtual reality

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