Look to the relationship: A review of African American women substance users' poor treatment retention and working alliance development

Telsie A. Davis, Julie Ancis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Emergent findings specific to African American women confirm that their substance user treatment retention rates are significantly lower than other groups, which is problematic given that substance user treatment is effective largely to the extent that clients are retained in treatment. This article reviews existing literature concerning disparities in treatment retention, highlights a significant barrier to treatment retention for this population, and presents support for an empirical focus on culturally responsive working alliance development as a promising step toward improving retention rates for African American women substance users.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)662-672
Number of pages11
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume47
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Keywords

  • African American women
  • Substance users
  • Treatment retention
  • Working alliance

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