Melting mechanisms of single-component polymers in co-rotating twin-screw kneading blocks through visual and microscopic analysis

Mohamed Esseghir, Dong Woo Yu, Costas G. Gogos, David B. Todd, Zehev Tadmor

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Visual and microscopy analysis was performed on solid carcasses collected from the split-barrel Twin-Screw Mixing Element Evaluator (TSMEE) (1) to study melting phenomena and mechanisms of single-component polymers in twin-screw kneading blocks. The results were interpreted in terms of dissipative phenomena such as interparticle frictional heat generation, irreversible deformation and break of the particulate solids and viscous energy dissipation of the resulting melt or melt solid mixtures. Simple estimates of the thermal energy generated by each of the above phenomena were carried out for a number of polymer systems of different particulate size and solid and melt properties. The contributions of each dissipative phenomenon on the healing of Polypropylene (PP) powder or pellets, LDPE and PET were experimentally evaluated. To better understand the effect of the particulate size distribution on the melting of PP powders, batch melting experiments woe conducted with a regular Brabender batch mixer at the Polymer Processing Institute and with the glass end plate fitted apparatus of Dr. Chi-Kai Shih at his DuPont Laboratories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages3684-3689
Number of pages6
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1997 55th Annual Technical Conference, ANTEC. Part 3 (of 3) - Toronto, Can
Duration: Apr 27 1997May 2 1997

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1997 55th Annual Technical Conference, ANTEC. Part 3 (of 3)
CityToronto, Can
Period4/27/975/2/97

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Polymers and Plastics

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