Micromechanical simulation of geotechnical problems using massively parallel supercomputers

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Abstract

This paper demonstrates that the architecture of a massively parallel supercomputers can be adapted for micromechanical simulations of geotechnical problems, if the correct architecture and computer algorithms are used. The Discrete Element Method (DEM) was used on a Connection Machine (CM-5), a massively parallel supercomputer with 512 nodes, to simulate geotechnical boundary value problems. For the demonstration, two triaxial test were simulated using an algorithm entitled 'TRUBAL for Parallel Machines (TPM)' based on the Discrete Element Method. In this trial demonstration, the inherent parallelism within DEM algorithms is shown for a Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) approach. Then a comparison is made between the parallel algorithm (TPM) and the serial algorithm (TRUBAL) to show the benefits of this research. TPM performed this simulation nine times faster than TRUBAL.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of Engineering Mechanics
PublisherASCE
Pages717-721
Number of pages5
Volume2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
EventProceedings of the 1996 11th Conference on Engineering Mechanics. Part 1 (of 2) - Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA
Duration: May 19 1996May 22 1996

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1996 11th Conference on Engineering Mechanics. Part 1 (of 2)
CityFort Lauderdale, FL, USA
Period5/19/965/22/96

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Architecture

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