Mismatch of morphological and functional polycentricity in Chinese cities: An evidence from land development and functional linkage

Wenze Yue, Tianyu Wang, Yong Liu, Qun Zhang, Xinyue Ye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

The polycentric urban structure is regarded to be more rational than the monocentric structure in recent urban studies. However, challenges have emerged in the implementation of the polycentric strategy accompanying with rapid urbanization in developing countries. The concept of polycentricity need to be re-examined in the developing context and the performance of polycentric urban development need to be further quantitatively assessed. This paper attempted to fill the research gaps and established a general framework for evaluating intra-urban polycentricity based on China's context. The measurement of morphological and functional polycentricity as well as the relationship between them were explored based on urban big data. Using the case of Shanghai, it was found that the functional subcenters identified by mobile phone communication data are not always consistent with the morphological subcenters recognized through land development. The development of functional polycentricity (e.g., urban functional linkages) generally lags behind that of morphological advancement (e.g., physical urban expansion). Both socioeconomic and planning forces have significantly shaped the polycentric pattern of Shanghai. Policies that aimed to promote the further development of polycentricity are also proposed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number104176
JournalLand Use Policy
Volume88
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Forestry
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Keywords

  • Functional polycentricity
  • Land use
  • Mobile phone communication data
  • Morphological polycentricity
  • Shanghai
  • Urban planning

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