Plastic energy dissipation and its role on heating/melting of single-component polymers and multi-component polymer blends

Bainian Qian, David B. Todd, Costas Gogos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Plastic energy dissipation (PED) of polymer particulates is, essentially, the energy dissipated during large and repeated plastic deformations of compacted polymer particulates while still in the solid state. PED is higher or much higher than VED, the viscous energy dissipation source of polymeric melts, because the stresses necessary to plastically deform viscoelastic polymer solids are orders of magnitude higher than the stresses needed to support viscous flow. In the last few years our group has demonstrated experimentally the dominant role which PED plays in the heating/melting of solid polymer (compacted) particulate beds in compounding processing equipment, such as twin-screw extruders and counterrotating continuous mixers/melters, in which the deformation of solid polymers is mandatory. We have also developed simple empirical methods of predicting the total axial distance needed for melting a given polymer in specific processing/compounding machines and processing conditions, as well as the melting rates, all based on the mechanical energy dissipated during solid particulate compression. This work explores the more complex issue of how the PED behavior of single-component polymers may affect the PED (and the heating/melting) behavior of multi-component polymer blends.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-95
Number of pages11
JournalAdvances in Polymer Technology
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Polymers and Plastics

Keywords

  • Melting mechanism
  • Plastic energy dissipation
  • Polymer blends
  • Twin-screw extrusion

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