Seasonal climatic factors influence on monocyclic aromatics rate of release and decay in water from surface spills of oil sands products

Thomas L. King, Brian Robinson, Kenneth Lee, Haoshuai Li, Michel Boufadel, Jason A.C. Clyburne

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

This paper outlines a dissolution model to show the fate of monocyclic aromatics, released from the diluent (thinning agent), in water during the simulated natural weathering of oil sands products (Access Western Blend, Western Canadian Select and Surmont Synthetic Bitumen) and conventional crude oil (Heidrun) on water. Based on mass balances ca. 0.3 to 4 % of the monocyclics were removed from the oil through dissolution, depending on oil type. Of the climatic factors assessed: air and water temperatures, wind speed and solar energy had a significant (p<0.05) effect on the rate of release and decay of monocyclics in water, depending on oil type. In addition, season had a significant (p<0.05) effect on the decay of monocyclics in water from spills of oil sands products, where a greater rate of decay occurred in summer than spring. This suggests that evaporation and possibly to a lesser degree photo-chemical weathering and biodegradation of these chemicals occurred in the water column.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages773-790
Number of pages18
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Event42nd Arctic and Marine Oilspill Program - Technical Seminar on Environmental Contamination and Response, AMOP 2019 - Halifax, Canada
Duration: Jun 4 2019Jun 6 2019

Conference

Conference42nd Arctic and Marine Oilspill Program - Technical Seminar on Environmental Contamination and Response, AMOP 2019
Country/TerritoryCanada
CityHalifax
Period6/4/196/6/19

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Water Science and Technology
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Pollution
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

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