Self-esteem, need gratification, and work satisfaction: A test of competing explanations from consistency theory and self-enhancement theory

Mark John Somers, Joel Lefkowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

A sample of 112 administrators provided self-report data used to test two hypotheses derived from Korman's consistency model of work behavior. As predicted, those with high self-esteem experienced significantly greater need gratification than did those with low self-esteem, and self-esteem also significantly positively moderated the relationship between n gratification and work satisfaction. Need gratification was assessed for only those needs that were most salient for each person, thus eliminating a rival interpretation of the findings derived from the self-enhancement model of self-esteem. The moderating effect of self-esteem on the n gratification-work satisfaction relationship was limited to those experiencing low levels of n gratification, indicating a possible "boundary condition" of consistency theory. A problem with the use of moderator variables in behavioral science was also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-311
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Vocational Behavior
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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