Survival versus traditional methodologies for studying employee turnover: Differences, divergences and directions for future research

Mark John Somers, Dee Birnbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite initial enthusiasm for using survival analysis techniques to gain new insights into employee turnover, nearly one decade later hardly any studies based on survival methodologies are evident in the literature. Consequently, the potential for survival analysis to open new avenues in turnover research remains unassessed, and the need for research on this topic is readily apparent. In this study, survival analysis methods were compared with those inherent in 'traditional' turnover research. Results indicated significant divergences between these two methods. The traditional turnover methodology reproduced findings characteristic of the vast majority of research on this topic -job withdrawal intentions emerged as the sole predictor of employee turnover behavior. In contrast, continuance commitment and ethnicity were directly predictive of turnover behavior using survival analysis methods. Implications of these results and directions for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-284
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Organizational Behavior
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1999

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Psychology(all)
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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