The evolution of illustrated texts and their effect on science: Examples from early American state geological reports

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Abstract

In the 19th century, printing methods made significant advances that allowed mass production of illustrated texts; prior to that time, illustrated texts were expensive and rare. The number of illustrated texts thus rose exponentially, increasing the rate of information transfer among scientists, engineers and the general public. The early American state geological reports, funded by the state legislatures, were among the pioneering volumes that used the new graphic capabilities in the improved printing processes for the advancement of science. They contain thousands of illustrations - woodcuts, etchings, lithographs and hand-painted maps - that may be of interest to historians of science, technology, art and culture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-127
Number of pages8
JournalLeonardo
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Music
  • Computer Science Applications

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