Towards an understanding of social inference opportunities in social computing

Julia M. Mayer, Richard P. Schuler, Quentin Jones

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Social computing applications are transforming the way we make new social ties, work, learn and play, thus becoming an essential part our social fabric. As a result, people and systems routinely make inferences about people's personal information based on their disclosed personal information. Despite the significance of this phenomenon the opportunity to make social inferences about users and how this process can be managed is poorly understood. In this paper we 1) outline why social inferences are important to study in the context of social computing applications, 2) how we can model, understand and predict social inference opportunities 3) highlight the need for social inference management systems, and 4) discuss the design space and associated research challenges. Collectively, this paper provides the first systematic overview for social inference research in the area of social computing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGROUP'12 - Proceedings of the ACM 2012 International Conference on Support Group Work
Pages239-248
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 4 2012
Event2012 17th ACM International Conference on Supporting Group Work, GROUP 2012 - Sanibel Island, FL, United States
Duration: Oct 27 2012Oct 31 2012

Publication series

NameGROUP'12 - Proceedings of the ACM 2012 International Conference on Support Group Work

Other

Other2012 17th ACM International Conference on Supporting Group Work, GROUP 2012
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySanibel Island, FL
Period10/27/1210/31/12

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Networks and Communications

Keywords

  • Impression management
  • Personalization
  • Privacy
  • Social computing
  • Social inference

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