Using mind maps to study how business school students andfaculty organize and apply general business knowledge

Mark John Somers, Katia Passerini, Annaleena Parhankangas, Jose Casal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Concerns have been raised that business school pedagogy has limited students' intellectual development with respect to integrative thinking, synthetic reasoning and the ability analyze complex problems. Mind maps were used in this study to explore these concerns. Specifically, undergraduate and MBA students, and business school faculty performed a mind mapping exercise for a complex, multifaceted problem. Results supported concerns about students' intellectual development. Mind maps indicated that advanced undergraduate and advanced MBA students partitioned knowledge into distinct silos and that their knowledge bases were thin. In contrast, business school faculty developed rich mind maps characterized by dense connections among concepts. Implications of these findings for business school pedagogy were discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Management Education
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Strategy and Management

Keywords

  • Business school model
  • Cognitive maps
  • Mind maps
  • Student learning

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