Work-in-progress: Integrating makerspace in first-year engineering curriculum

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Makerspace and similar advanced manufacturing labs are becoming commonplace at engineering colleges and universities throughout the United States. Although these spaces are hugely popular with students and faculty, only a select few students take full advantage of the opportunities available through such spaces. In order to get more students to utilize Makerspace and similar high-tech labs, it is important to introduce them to such spaces as early as possible. New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), a mid-size polytechnic university, recently opened a large Makerspace. Students in select few sections of the first-year fundamentals of engineering design (FED) course participated. The idea was to (1) teach students what Makerspace can offer to them; and (2) have them complete one or two simple 3D printing projects. Project 1 served primarily to get students to complete the required training and to learn about the Makerspace and 3D printing, whereas, Project 2 focused on engaging students in a competition based on the products they have designed and 3D printed. The winners of the competition from each of the participating section were allowed to 3D print a medium-sized object of their choice. This initiative was very successful as evidenced by strong satisfaction reported by the students in a post-activity survey. We have since made it a permanent part of the course.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - Jul 28 2019
Event11th Annual First-Year Engineering Experience Conference, FYEE 2019 - State College, United States
Duration: Jul 28 2019Jul 30 2019

Conference

Conference11th Annual First-Year Engineering Experience Conference, FYEE 2019
CountryUnited States
CityState College
Period7/28/197/30/19

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

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